History

Informal worship services of Langford United Church began in a hall in the Langford area of Victoria in December 1951. An Official Board was constituted in April 1952. In May 1956, the congregation voted to change their name to Gordon United Church, in honour of the Rev. C.W. Gordon (Ralph Connor). A church building was constructed and dedicated in October, 1956.


Rev. Dr. Charles William Gordon

Rev. Dr. Charles William Gordon, or Ralph Connor, (September 13, 1860 – October 31, 1937) was a Canadian novelist, using the Connor pen name while maintaining his status as a Church leader, first in the Presbyterian and later the United Churches in Canada. Gordon was also at one time a master at Upper Canada College. He sold more than five million copies of his works in his lifetime,[1] and some of his works are still in print.

His publications include:

  • The angel and the star. Toronto, Revell, 1908. 63p.
  • The arm of gold. Toronto, McClelland and Stewart, 1932. 314p.
  • Beyond the marshes. Toronto, Westminster, 1898. 36p.
  • Black Rock, a tale of the Selkirks. Toronto, Westminster, 1898. 327 p.
  • Breaking the record. New York, Revell, 1904. 31p.
  • The Prospector. New York, Revell, 1904. 401p.
  • The Doctor
  • The Man from Glengarry
  • Glengarry School Days

Our Pulpit was donated to our church in 1954 by First United Church. A Mr. Watt (formerly owned London Silk Co.) had died and his wife donated a new big pulpit to First United as a Memorial to him. We received their smaller pulpit. Mr.& Mrs. W. G. McDonald of Gordon United were married in 1923 in front of this pulpit at First United – by Rev. Dr. Wilson. The day the pulpit was dedicated in our church in 1959 the same Dr. Wilson took the service.

Our Communion Cups were donated by Belmont United Church.


Gordon United’s Lamppost

Our Lamppost – in 1965, a light standard from Liverpool, England was installed on the east side of Gordon United. It was donated by the Guiness Exporting Company of England. The firm obtained a number of these street lamps from Liverpool when the city discarded the old installations for modern lighting. This came to the attention of Rev. Van Druten, our minister at the time. In a letter to the firm, he described the lack of street lighting and the church grounds which would be enhanced by such an historical and useful lamp. Consequently, a Liverpool light and a plaque were shipped free of charge to Victoria. Scarred by the years, which included two wars, the standard was restored by Mr. Art Buxton. The cost of installation was covered by volunteers. A warm glow emanates from this “little bit of England” to brighten a corner of our world.

 

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Our Historic Corner Stone

1 congregation photo Don Hatfield

 Congregation Photo 1993